Record Store Day 2018

Today is Record Store Day. Did you get out and support your local/area independent record stores? Sadly, I was unable to this year. So I have no new additions to my record collection from Record Store Day this year, but I would like to take this time to share my first ever record purchase….

I was 6 or 7 years old, and had well and truly come out of my Osmonds phase thanks to my babysitter’s tween daughter, who had turned me on to Kiss. She had also introduced me to Donny and Marie, but I had already seen Kiss perform on The Midnight Special and preferred them to the squeaky-clean Osmonds because the music was ALL rock and roll – not “A Little Bit Country, A Little Bit Rock and Roll.” (see what I did there?) And at that age? It was before I knew what any bands were like as people, and before things like differing values and politics colored my perceptions. All four original members were still in the lineup, and I chose to believe they really were a Demon, Cat Man, Spaceman, and Starchild (which I also thought was a spaceman), although I knew even at that early age that that was the highest level of performance art I’d seen in music. Also, at that age, I just didn’t really know what that was.

“The Osmonds were a gateway drug to harder, heavier music.”

I don’t remember how long I saved, or physically going and buying it, but I do know that Kiss’ Love Gun was the first record I actually bought with my own money. I didn’t even buy it in “record” form, I bought the 8-track so we could listen to it in the car as well as at home. My mother was thrilled. (She wasn’t.)

My favorite song was the title track:

All said, I’m not much of a Kiss fan these days, but loved them well into my teens and am glad I had the opportunity to see them in concert – I just wish I had been able to see them before they ditched the makeup. The music remained enjoyable, but part of the magic was definitely gone at that point.

And I also think I should point out something pretty important here: I am not the first, second, or even third person I know who started out loving The Osmonds, but moved onto heavier, darker stuff. I have known a dozen or more who did. Sure, that doesn’t sound like much, but when it’s coming from me, who really never had much of a social circle at any point in my life, it’s actually kind of mind-blowing. I think it’s safe to say that The Osmonds were a gateway drug to harder, heavier music. So parents, take note. If your littles are currently obsessed with whatever this generation’s Osmonds is, then at least some of you have an obsession with metal and/or gangsta rap to look forward to in your child’s not-so-distant future. Get prepared now, and don’t say nobody warned you!

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